title
 Show Reports
 
October 23rd
October 24th/25th
October 26th
Last Day

 
Moroccan Vanadinite
French Fluorite
Dem. Rep. of the Congo
Uranium Minerals
Romanian Selenite
Naimiban Fluorite
Chinese Minerals
Kammererite
Cobaltoan Calcite
Russian Fluorite
Rare Species
Kazakhstan Apatite
Random Specimens

1999 Munich Show        2000 Munich Show       2001 Munich Show

The Official 2002 Munich Show Homepage

All specimens are from this show are now Sold though not necessarily marked as such
 

October 23rd

I have been in Munich for several days now.  The weather has been rather nice the past two days with a surprising amount of sun around and not too much rain!  There are still a lot of trees with vivid fall colors to be seen here. So I took an opportunity to see a little of Munich the morning of the 23rd before heading on over to the Messestadt for some rocks.
 
 

x
Here's a shot of the Olympic Stadium where the Olympics were held in 1972



 
 
 


x
Here are the two prominent buildings at or near to Marian Platz.  The building
on the left is the Town Hall and the image on the right is of a large church.



 
 
 


Here are the figurines located on the Town Hall which engage in a "dance" when the clock strikes noon.




Later in the morning I went to visit Herb Obodda at the Hotel Seibel where he is staying to see what he new about new minerals.  His hotel is near the large Theresienwiese Park where the famous Munchen Oktoberfest is held.  I took the liberty of taking a series of shots which I splice together to convey the enormity of this event.  I have heard some staggering statistics about the amount of beer that is served during this week long celebration - over one million visitors and well over 20 million beers served!
 
 
 


Here are the beer halls being dismantled after the recent celebration of Oktoberfest.
All of these buildings are torn down then rebuild in time for the next installment of Oktoberfest.



Here is a shot of a church just north of Theresienweise Park. These old buildings
offer a striking skyline for much of Munich.

In the early afternoon I went to the Messestadt to see what was happening.  It was still quite early but in this day and age the early bird gets the worm.   First thing to do was get oriented with the halls in use this year.  The Messestadt is a surprisingly huge area of large halls used for conventions.   There are 15 of these large buildings (halls) on the complex and this year's show is using three of them as in the past.   Last  year the show was held in halls B1, B2 and B3.  This year it is in A4, A5 and A6.  Each one of the halls is about the size of the main show at the Tucson Convention center.  So this show essentially dwarfs the Tucson Main Show by a large measure in terms of floor space with minerals to see.
 
 
 


Here are shots of some of the large vans with minerals and a shot of Hall A4 where anyone with minerals on display had a small crowd.




Being the first day that people were arriving at the show, there was more congestion and visiting than there were minerals to see.   I hall A4 there were a fair number of Chinese and Moroccan dealers with their material out on tables.  In terms of new minerals there is a new find of rhodochrosite from Guangxi Province.  There were some of these seen at the Denver Show last month that had a bit higher quality (deeper red color) but there were not nearly as many as are seen here.  The quality of the rhodochrosite looks a lot like average peruvian material and it is found with fluorite and, in some cases, apatite, which is very similar to the mineral assemblage at the Sweet Home mine in Colorado.  The prices being asked for these specimens, however, is clearly not founded in reality and most dealers I have talked with believe that better material and lower prices will be forthcoming in time.  But for the past two days all of the specimens that I have seen have all remained on the dealer's tables.  Other interesting Chinese material available are several fine combination specimens of spessartine and smoky quartz from Tongbei, Yunxiao, Fujiang, China.  At the Denver Show last month I found a fine muscovite crystal studded with spessartine crystals.  I have scoured the show here looking for more and found only two from Dr. Liu of AAA Minerals.  There were others but they all had problems not the least of which is that most were repaired.  I also found a combination specimen with smoky quartz, spessartine and fine green octahedral crystals of fluorite.   The specimens with just spessartine and quartz are abundant but these off the wall combination pieces are surprisingly rare.
 
 


Here is a shot of Dr. Liu who manages AAA Minerals. He's very knowledgeable
about all of the myriad new minerals coming out of China these days.



x
Here are shots of preparation for the coming opening and a shot of Jordi Fabre sorting
through some of his flats of specimens prior to setting them up in his display cases.

Also seen at the Denver show were specimens of electric pink cobaltoan calcite on pyrite from Bou Azzer in Morroco.   There is a lot of Moroccan cobaltoan calcite around but only a small amount with the striking pyrite contrast or pieces with the neon pink color.   I did find some buried in one of the Moroccan dealer's unopened boxes and bagged them.   Other Moroccan pieces of interest were some find of yellow fluorite specimens from Aouli, Talmessite from Ourlil, and a specimen of yellowish green smithsonite from Bouafra, and a specimen of scorodite from Humlil.  I could not resist the Vanadinite that was here.  One of the Moroccan dealers - Tresor de l'Atlas - had a very fine array of lustrous, brilliant red crystals on barite.  His pieces were a cut above the rest of the material that is here so I forked out for some of the better pieces he had.
 
 


Here are two of the more interesting specimens of cobaltoan calcite I obtained at the show.



Here are two of the more interesting specimens of vanadinite I obtained at the show.



 
 


Here is the only smithsonite I found - a rich yellowish green colored specimen about 6 cm across.
The color suggests that it is cadmium rich.

Other important news about Morocco is that the famous Touissit Mine is now closed and filling with water rapidly. Touissit is best known for the azurite, wulfenite, cerussite and anglesite specimens that it has produced in recent years. You can expect to see quality specimens from this locality begin to climb and become scarce now that the source of new material is gone.

An eastern European dealer in hall A4 had some fine specimens of kammererite this day but the prices were just not founded in reality.  I think the new Euro had this fellow baffled... More on him later in the show.

I visited Jordi Fabre's booth and found that he had some unusual, recently found specimens of selenite that are included with boulangerite from Romania.
 


Here is one of several specimens of the boulangerite included selenite that I obtained from Jordi.




A note here on the state of the mineral market here in Germany.  As I mentioned at Sainte Marie last summer the glory days of the US Dollar's high value relative to the European currency are over - maybe not forever but for now most definitely.  Prices here are as high as they are at shows in the US and since the dollar and euro are essentially the same in value it feels a lot like Tucson here.  Also, the dealers from Morocco and China who have traditionally supplied minerals to the wholesale end of the business are now asking retail prices for their material.  It is a common topic of discussion here on how high the prices are.   Lastly, there is not much of anything new here of significance.  There are many new finds but there generally confined to rare species. The mineral world is clearly going through a lull in new finds which began at the Tucson Show in February.  Despite that there are a very large number of good specimens here which come from old or known localities.  There is still a lot to come so there may be surprises yet but generally all of the truly exceptional new material is out in the early moments of a show like this.

The rest of my first day was spent getting oriented and getting my web connection established.  This year Jeff Scovil and I will be sharing a room.  Jeff is the official mineral photographer here at the Show.  This year John Keilmann, the show organizer, has asked me to be the Munich Show's Internet reporter on what is new in minerals.

Lots more to come!

John

Follow the links below to see pages from the largest show in Europe!

Show Reports


October 23rd
October 24th/25th
October 26th
Last Day
Moroccan Vanadinite
French Fluorite
Dem. Rep. of the Congo
Uranium Minerals
Romanian Selenite
Naimiban Fluorite
Chinese Minerals
Kammererite
Cobaltoan Calcite
Russian Fluorite
Rare Species
Kazakhstan Apatite
Random Specimens
 

1999 Munich Show        2000 Munich Show       2001 Munich Show

The Official 2002 Munich Show Homepage



Trinity Mineral Co
Tsumeb
Rare Minerals
MineralShows.Com
Benitoite Mine

All images, text and stuff on these pages copyright John Veevaert -Trinity Mineral Company 2002